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Happy Holidays

Posted by on Dec 22, 2014 in General, Health & Wellness | 0 comments

Happy Holidays

As we come to the close of yet another year, may we take this opportunity to reflect on the many success stories we have shared this year with so many of you. Thank you for inviting us to create innovative solutions for you and your family’s most challenging health issues. We appreciate your trust in our ability to work with you in your health transformation. Over this past year, we’ve grown and developed to expand our scientific knowledge, our research, and physicians that specialize in unique integrative medicine. With this diversification and expansion, we look to offer even greater services and health offerings in the coming year. Thomas Incledon, PhD, has continued to develop unique and integrated customized plans involving supplement strategies, various modalities and more that are unique for each individual after complete nutrient and hormone testing. Hayle Aldren, MDH, has had a year of expanding patient treatments with neurological conditions, Injection therapies, traumatic brain injuries, cancer, and Parkinson’s Disease.  Dr. Aldren continues to prove that chronic conditions can be improved and often reversed, and that genetic predispositions and inherited tendencies can be overcome through personalized and preventative medicine. Through use of new technologies, including Ozone Therapy, Dr. Aldren addresses some of life’s most threatening conditions with optimism and solid results. Kristy Anderson, NMD, has joined us full time this past year and brought an expansion of our integrative medical physicians for diversification of patient care. Dr. Anderson is an expert in homeopathy and a member of the HPCUS as well as a consultant for international homeopathic companies. She brings with her integrative medical expertise from her studies with European trained physicians as well as being an authority who lectures nationally on integrated medicine and homeopathy. This coming year she will continue to expand her offerings here at HPS to include Integrative aesthetics as well as continuing with women’s health and hormones, medical and nutritional life coaching, pain management, and other primary care modalities, in addition to pain management including PRP and other regenerative medical therapies. Michael J. Breus, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist and both a Diplomate of the American Board of Sleep Medicine and a Fellow of The American Academy of Sleep Medicine. He was one of the youngest people to have passed the Board at age 31 and, with a specialty in Sleep Disorders and Neuropsychological Testing, is one of only 163 psychologists in the world with his credentials and distinction. His first book, GOOD NIGHT: The Sleep Doctor’s 4-Week Program to Better Sleep and Better Health (Dutton/Penguin), an Amazon Top 100 Best Seller, has been met with rave reviews and continues to change the lives of readers. It is now available in paperback as BEAUTY SLEEP: Look Younger, Lose Weight, and Feel Great Through Better Sleep. His second book, The Sleep Doctor’s Diet Plan, Lose Weight through Better Sleep, (Rodale), launches mid-May on the Dr. Oz daytime television show, who along with Travis Stork MD host of The Doctors, Rosie O’Donnel and Arianna Huffington (founder of the Huffington Post) have graciously reviewed and been quoted on the jacket cover. As the subject of sleep gains greater momentum in our sleep-deprived society, Dr. Breus has become a widely recognized leader in this highly- evolving field. Dedicated to raising awareness of both sleep disorders and what he...

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Could Food Allergies Be to Blame?

Posted by on Jul 31, 2013 in Diet & Nutrition, Health & Wellness | 0 comments

Could Food Allergies Be to Blame?

Your symptoms may be caused by food allergies Science and medicine have advanced well into the next frontier, rapidly expanding our knowledge of the human body and destroying previous limitations for treating complex conditions. Despite that, millions of Americans still suffer with seemingly simple issues like low energy, mood swings, nagging aches and pains, and gastrointestinal distress. One often overlooked explanation for these conditions is adverse reactions to food, especially food allergies. When most people hear about symptoms of food allergies, they envision a full blown anaphylactic shock, but not all food allergy symptoms are life threatening. Food allergy symptoms The most common immediate food allergy symptoms include: • Tingling or itching of the mouth or skin • Redness, hives, rash, or eczema • Swelling of the lips, face, tongue, or throat Adverse reactions can also be delayed, occurring hours or even days later, making it difficult to identify problematic foods. The most common delayed food allergy symptoms include: • Headaches or migraines • Gastrointestinal distress including gas, indigestion, or diarrhea • Fatigue or lethargy • Mood changes, anxiety, irritability, or depression Food allergy testing A simple way to identify if food allergies are causing your condition is to undergo food allergy testing. At Human Health Specialists, we utilize multiple forms of food allergy testing to reveal as many problematic foods as possible, as well as food additives (e.g., coloring, preservatives, etc.) and many common molds/fungi. For information about food allergy testing or to schedule a consultation, call Human Health Specialists at (480)...

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Joint Pain Basics

Posted by on Jul 26, 2013 in Exercise & Fitness, Health & Wellness | 0 comments

Joint Pain Basics

What is Joint Pain? Joint pain is a growing epidemic that’s not always given the attention it deserves from healthcare professionals including doctors. Joint pain is sometimes called arthritis or arthralgia; it’s a debilitating problem if not dealt with promptly and appropriately. Have you ever woken up in the morning feeling achy? Does it take you a while to get going? Maybe the joint pain lasts all day and even affects your ability to sleep? Doctors and physicians are too busy popping us with pills to deal with the pain which usually have a host of side effects and even gets us hooked on them. Joint pain itself can be excruciating to live with and the consequences that this pain brings to your normal daily living can be mentally exhausting – not being able to do your normal daily physical tasks such as getting out of bed, walking down the stairs, carrying groceries, or even driving the car.  In fact, record numbers of individuals are opting for hip, shoulder, and knee replacements, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Who Suffers from Joint Pain? We all suffer from joint pain at one time or another in our lives. Joint pain can be a result of many issues such as overuse of the joints, the aging process, specific medical issues, and there may be a genetic component to it. Certain lifestyle factors including smoking, medications, exercise, and dietary intake may even influence joint pain.  Fortunately, we can control what we eat and the exercise that we do which play a large bearing on how long the pain persists, how you manage the pain, and your chances of developing further joint pain issues. Our bodies are a lot like cars or even bicycles; if you know your way around a car or bike, it’s a simple way of understanding how the human body works. If you ensure you fuel it and use the appropriate oils it runs smoothly, it doesn’t break down, and it’s more efficient. The same can be said for the human body if you chose the right food and nutrients it runs smoothly. Joint Pain Relief A food supplement called collagen hydrolysate appears to be effective in relieving joint pain, regenerating cartilage, and it has an anti-inflammatory effect. Relief of osteoarthritis pain in the knee or hip was noted in a study of patients receiving 10 g collagen hydrolysate daily over a 2-month period.  In fact, many clinical studies have shown that a daily dose of 10 g of collagen hydrolysate to be effective for a wide range of issues including patients that have undergone the surgical repair of joints. Administration should be at least over a period of 3 months. It is very safe and does not react with drugs or other foods or food ingredients, making it a much more sensible option for the treatment of long-term joint pain than other medications. If you’re suffering from joint pain, consider natural options like collagen hydrolysate, therapeutic exercise, or dietary changes that reduce inflammation. In many cases, these natural options can reduce or eliminate joint pain without the need for harmful drugs or invasive surgeries. Adam, M. Therapie Der Osteoarthrose –Welche Wirkung Haben Gelantineparaprate? Therapiewoche1991;41:2456-61 Bello, A.E., Oesser, S. Collagen hydrolysate for the treatment of osteoarthritis and other joint...

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Guide to Buying a Better Multivitamin

Posted by on Jan 7, 2013 in Diet & Nutrition, Health & Wellness | 0 comments

Guide to Buying a Better Multivitamin

Guide to Buying a Better Multivitamin Even the healthiest eaters following a varied diet can have nutritional deficiencies including low levels of important vitamins and minerals. Without a comprehensive vitamin and mineral analysis, it’s nearly impossible to accurately assess which specific micronutrients you’re lacking, and even then changes in physical activity, stress, sunlight exposure, and numerous other factors can affect your nutrient needs. Enter the multivitamin. Comprehensive multivitamins provide “nutritional insurance” by delivering adequate amounts of all of the vitamins and minerals your body needs. But not all multivitamins are created equal; many vitamin manufacturers cut costs by skimping on vitamin and mineral quantities and by using the least expensive, least effective (and sometimes dangerous) forms. Below is a list of the vitamins and minerals you should find in a good quality multivitamin. We’ve also included the Institute of Medicine’s recommended daily intake (DRI) for men and women, a recommended maximum daily intake (when appropriate), the forms to look for on your multivitamin’s label, and some common multivitamin add-ons. DRI* – Men DRI* – Women Max daily intake What forms to look for Vitamin A 900 µg or 4500 IU 700 µg or 3500 IU 3000 µg or 15,000 IU Mixed carotinoids and/or beta carotene B1 (Thiamine) 1.2 mg 1.1 mg – Thiamine di-phosphate or thiamine HCl B2 (Riboflavin) 1.3 mg 1.1 mg – Riboflavin-5’-phosphate or riboflavin B3 (Niacin) 16 mg 14 mg 35 mg Niacin or Niacinamide B5 (Pantothenic acid) 5 mg 5 mg – Pantothenic acid or D-calcium pantothenate B6 (Pyridoxine) 1.3-1.7 mg 1.3-1.7 mg 100 mg Pyridoxal-5′-phosphate or pyridoxine HCl B7 (Biotin) 30 µg 30 µg – Biotin B9 (Folate) 400 µg 400 µg 1000 µg 5-MTHF or folate/folic acid B12 (Cobalamins) 2.4 µg 2.4 µg – Methylcobalamin or cyanocobalamin C 90 mg 75 mg – Ascorbic acid or ascorbates D 5-15 µg or 200-600 IU 5-15 µg or 200-600 IU 5000 IU Cholecalciferol E 15 mg 15 mg 1000 mg D-alpha-tocopherol, mixed tocopherols, and/or mixed tocotrienols K 120 µg 90 µg – Phylloquinone or phytonadione Potassium 4700 mg 4700 mg Potassium citrate or aspartate Calcium 1000 mg 1000 mg 2500 mg Amino acid chelate, malate, citrate, or carbonate Magnesium 420 mg 320 mg 750 mg Amino acid chelate, glycinate, or threonate Zinc 11 mg 8 mg 40 mg Amino acid chelate, monomethionine, or glycinate Iron 8 mg 18 mg 45 mg Iron protein succinylate Manganese 2.3 mg 1.8 mg 11 mg Amino acid chelate or gluconate Copper 900 µg 900 µg 10 mg Amino acid chelate, lysinate, or glycinate Iodine 150 µg 150 µg 1100 µg Potassium iodide or kelp Selenium 55 µg 55 µg 400 µg Selenomethionine, amino acid complex, or glycinate Molybdenum 45 µg 45 µg 2000 µg Amino acid chelate or citrate Chromium 35 mg 25 mg – Chromium polynicotinate (ChromeMate®) or picolinate Boron – – – Boron citrate or proteinate Common add-ons Lutein – – – Lutein Lycopene – – – Lycopene Zeaxanthin – – – Zeaxanthin Choline 550 mg 425 mg – Choline bitartrate or phosphatidylcholine Inositol – – – Inositol Vanadium – – 1.8 mg Vanadyl sulfate *The DRI – or Dietary Reference Intake – listed here is for men and women ages 14 years old and above. Micronutrient needs for infants, children, teens, and pregnant and lactating women can be significantly different than those listed. The amount of each vitamin...

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Naturopathic Approach to Abnormal Paps

Posted by on Jul 11, 2012 in Health & Wellness, Women's Health | 0 comments

During female wellness exams, cell samples from the cervix and vagina are obtained to see if any of these cells have changed and are pre-cancerous or cancerous. This is called a Pap smear. At the same time, practitioners can check for the presence of certain strains of the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) such as 18 and 16. If these strains are present, the female is at a greater risk for cervical cancer. Depending on the level of cell change and the presence of certain HPV strains, to obtain tissue biopsies, a colposcopy may then be performed. Both the cell state and the presence of certain strains of HPV are also analyzed to see which forms of treatment will be implemented. This can range from watchful waiting (performing another Pap smear with HPV in a certain time frame), a LEEP (loop electrosurgical excision procedure), or cryotherapy (using cold to remove abnormal tissue). Having a LEEP performed on the cervix to remove abnormal tissue can at times carry a risk of a preterm birth in future pregnancies. Naturopathic physicians are trained to perform an alternative technique to remove abnormal tissue called escharotic treatment. An escharotic* is a substance that corrodes tissue to form an eschar*, a scab. Rather than burning or freezing off tissue, we use corrosive agents that are a mixture of botanicals, enzymes, and zinc chloride as well as healing agents which are vitamins and botanicals that come in direct contact with the tissue. We will also have the patient take a variety of systemic, oral supplements to assist the body in healing as well as eradicating the HPV strain(s) infecting their body. Depending on the complexity of the cellular change, Naturopathic Medical Doctors may need to only prescribe certain vaginal suppositories and systemic support rather than escharotics treatment. There are certain levels of cellular change that cannot be treated by escharotics, in which case the patient needs to be referred to a gynecologist (M.D. or D.O.) for treatment. It is essential to understand all treatment options including the naturopathic medical approach, and escharotics are an effective, minimally invasive alternative in female health and abnormal Pap smears. If you are looking for a naturopathic approach to female exams and women’s medicine, contact the Naturopathic Medicine Doctors at Human Health Specialists. They are expects in the field of women’s...

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Milk and Minerals Can Aid in Weight Loss

Posted by on Jun 26, 2012 in Diet & Nutrition | 0 comments

Milk and Minerals Can Aid in Weight Loss

It is a well-known fact that milk is good for you because it gives you strong bones and teeth. But did you know that it can also help with weight loss? A study conducted in Mexico found that adding low-fat milk with micronutrients to an energy-restricted diet aided in fat loss. After four months of daily intake, BMI decreased and bone density improved, both of which are important factors while dieting. What The Study Did Participants of this study reduced their caloric intake and drank one cup of low-fat milk with added micronutrients three times daily for sixteen weeks. The low-fat milk was enriched with micronutrients such as vitamins A, B, C, D, and E as well as calcium, magnesium and iron. Those who drank milk with the added micronutrients had greater results than those who drank unfortified milk in the study. Study Results It appears that it is not milk alone that aids in weight loss but the combination of milk with micronutrients that creates positive results. Many people are vitamin and mineral deficient and the addition of these micronutrients may have provided the amount necessary for the body to perform at optimal levels, thus allowing for weight loss. Several of these supplemented vitamins are involved in fat metabolism such as calcium, and vitamins A, C, D, and E. Benefits of These Findings One of the great benefits of this diet is the increase in bone density. Many dieters lose bone minerals and density content because of their restricted diets. This can lead to osteoporosis, especially in women. Those who drank milk with micronutrients had a significant increase in bone density compared to those who drank unfortified milk. Keep in mind that some individuals have lactose intolerance or a dairy allergy and should avoid milk entirely, but can supplement with calcium, magnesium, vitamin A, B, C, D, and E. At Human Health Specialists, we provide nutrition counseling and can help you set up a healthy, individualized diet plan that will allow you attain your weight loss, fitness, and health goals. Come meet with our nutrition experts to integrate this into other healthy meal plans to fit your lifestyle.       References: Rosado J. L., Garcia O. P., Ronquillo D. Intake of Milk with Added Micronutrients increases the effectiveness of an energy-restricted diet to reduce body weight: a randomized controlled clinical trial in Mexican women. J Am Diet Assoc. 2011;...

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Weight Loss Maintainers Vs. Regainers

Posted by on Jun 19, 2012 in Health & Wellness | 0 comments

Weight Loss Maintainers Vs. Regainers

Weight loss has been a top priority for most and at sometimes puzzling. Losing weight by dieting, exercising, and professional/personal support can start diminishing pounds, but maintaining that weight loss can be the difficult part. In the first year after reducing their body fat, weight regains of 33% to 50% of the pounds lost are frequent for most. The weight cycling can even continue after the first year where the body fat fluctuates and the end result is more weight than what the individual started with. What tools are available for people who can keep the weight off (i.e. maintainers) and those who are on a roller coaster of weight loss and regain (i.e. regainers)? What Weight Loss Maintainers Do Differently The solution is simple; however, multiple tools used together can get the job done. Triumphant maintainers continue on their eating and exercise routines that proved successful for their weight loss. They use a scale on a consistent basis even when they know their weight has increased to remove denial. Maintainers have strategies to help them solve daily problems like using portion control, avoidance of certain trigger foods, reduce splurges, and meal repetition. Another major tool is a positive attitude. Removing words like failure and undisciplined from their word bank keeps them on track even when a small weight gain occurs.   Key Things You Can Do To Become a Weight Loss Maintainer, Not a Regainer There are some similarities to both maintainers and regainers. Both experience setbacks and challenges that can be emotionally and physically draining. Maintainers tend to adapt quickly and alter their lifestyle thus continuing on their eating and exercise strategies. While they both use clothing tightness to assess their success, maintainers also regularly use the scale to help accurately judge their current weight. Both need more support during their weight loss and then experience diminished support over time. This is unfortunate because reinforcement is still needed during the maintenance period when recording energy intake stops and turning back to old habits is likely. Maintainers will turn to family support as well as professional counselors or nutritionists. Producing an individualized long term program that is easily obtained is necessary to becoming a successful maintainer. Making lifestyle changes can be difficult and frustrating, but keeping an upbeat attitude, having the correct support, and adapting can make all the difference when you jump on that scale or try on your favorite jeans. Our doctors, nutritionists, and exercise physiologists are trained to help you reach your goals, whether it’s providing support after you have lost the weight or helping you reach your goal weight and staying there. Call us at (480) 883-7240 to set up an appointment for a consultation today!       References Reyes NR, Oliver TL, Klotz AA, et al. Similarities and Differences between Weight Loss Maintainers and Regainers: A Qualitative Analysis. J Acad Nutr Diet – April 2012 (Vol. 112, Issue 4, Pages 499-505, DOI:...

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Back, Again: Heartburn, Acid Reflux & GERD

Posted by on Jun 15, 2012 in Diet & Nutrition, Health & Wellness | 0 comments

Back, Again: Heartburn, Acid Reflux & GERD

Many suffer from heartburn, GERD, or acid reflux on a consistent basis. The acid and burning feelings always seem to come back, again and again. There are plenty of over the counter options that can relieve symptoms temporarily, but eliminating the problem permanently is ideal for most individuals. What Works? A huge contributing factor to acid reflux, GERD, and heartburn is food. Choosing what goes in can relieve and even eliminate symptoms. So, what works? Reducing cholesterol and high saturated fat intake, while increasing whole grains has proved beneficial in those with persistent acid reflux. In overweight or obese individuals (BMI >25) a low carbohydrate diet reduced acid exposure. Avoiding spicy foods, sweets, alcohol, carbonated and caffeinated drinks is also a good idea because these can cause gastric distress. Pectin’s high viscosity can help with gastric emptying so the burning feeling doesn’t even start. Fruits and vegetables are great sources of pectin (i.e. apples and carrots). Dietary nitrate may have a role in development of GERD so avoiding processed meats with nitrates is recommended. Combating heartburn also involves eating slowly, thoroughly chewing your food, and eating small meals throughout the day. More Things To Try As we said before, food is one of the biggest contributing factors to heartburn, acid reflux, and GERD. In addition to updating or changing your diet you may want to consider adding the following to your lifestyle: Nutrition’s partner, exercise, greatly reduces symptoms. Walking after a meal and continuous activity to help reduce and maintain weight is a great option for suffers. The upright position of walking is ideal to help the contents of the stomach move down; this is why laying down right after a meal can exacerbate symptoms. Supplementation of curcumin, melatonin, l-tryptophan, vitamin B6, folic acid, vitamin B12, methionine and betaine promotes regression of GERD symptoms with no significant side effects. Chewing gum for 30-60 minutes after a meal reduces acid contact time and increases salivation.   What else might work? Old home remedies like apple cider could help due to increased salivation, creating an alkaline environment and promote digestion. Raw honey may also be beneficial because of its soothing effect for the throat and it also helps grow good bacteria in the gut. Skim milk can cause temporary relief for some because of the calcium, but can also increase acid secretion in others. Following a diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains along with adequate exercise is the best prescription. Also, grab a pack of gum on your way out the door. If you are struggling with chronic heartburn, acid reflux, or GERD, our doctors, nutritionists, and exercise physiologists can help you find the relief options that work for you, help you relieve the pain and get your life back. Call us at (480) 883-7240 to set up an appointment for a consultation today! References: Austin, G.L., et al., A very low-carbohydrate diet improves gastroesophageal reflux and its symptoms. Dig Dis Sci, 2006. 51(8): p. 1307-12. Avidan, B., et al., Walking and chewing reduce postprandial acid reflux. Aliment pharmacol Ther, 2001. 15(2): p. 151-5. Dutta, S.K., K. Agrawal, and M.A. Mahmoud, Modulation of salivation and heartburn in response to the site of acid infusion in the human oesophagus. Aliment pharmacol Ther, 2010. 32(6): p. 795-800. El-Serag, H.B., J.A. Satia,...

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A Heavy Liver: More About Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

Posted by on May 14, 2012 in Diet & Nutrition, Health & Wellness | 0 comments

A Heavy Liver: More About Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

The liver is one of our vital organs and has multiple functions within the body. Naming a fraction of its role; it can metabolize carbohydrates, detoxify the blood, store iron, and produce bile. Mistreating the body also abuses the liver and fat accumulation can occur. 70 million adults in the United States alone suffer from the most prevalent liver disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The worst form is nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) that can elicit a liver transplant due to cirrhosis or increase in connective tissue that impedes the liver’s function. Why so many cases of fatty liver? Obesity is the common factor in most of the individuals. Excessive energy intake, especially carbohydrates and fat, can lower insulin sensitivity and raise free fatty acids in the blood that can be stored in the liver. The liver is not designed to store fat so the accumulation causes major problems. Combating NAFLD means adjusting carbohydrate and fat ratios, becoming and staying active, and losing at least 5-10% of body fat. What can help a fatty liver? Nutrition and exercise are the key to reduce fatty liver, with nutrition being the main factor. When weight loss is achieved through diet alone the liver’s enzymes lower to normal levels and hepatic steatosis (fatty degeneration) is reduced. A diet of 25 kcal/kg/day consisting of lower carbohydrates (no more than 35%) can help reverse NAFLD. The carbohydrates should be whole grains, nothing processed or white, and removal of soda and high fructose corn syrup is recommended. The Mediterranean diet is a great option because it can provide the right kind of fats and lean protein. Reducing saturated fatty acids to 10%, increasing monounsaturated fats like olive oil, and consuming 1-2 g/day of Omega-3 is suggested. Additionally, supplements and nutrients can be beneficial. Vitamin E and probiotics have been shown to reduce lipid peroxidation and reduce inflammation. Ginger and caffeine may have a role in protecting the liver, as well. Weight loss is the objective to help a fatty liver, but sustained, controlled and slow reduction in weight is ideal. In some people weight loss of more than 2.5 lbs/week can cause more injury to the liver. Along with a solid diet plan, moderate-vigorous exercise no less than 150 min/week can improve the liver and increase weight loss. How can I transform a heavy or fatty liver? Transforming your heavy liver to a fit and lighter version can be easy with goal setting and some lifestyle changes. If you have been diagnosed with a fatty liver, contact one of the doctors at Human Health Specialists who will work with our nutritionists and exercise physiologists to create a plan to regain your health. Or, contact our front office to schedule .       References McCarthy EM, Rinella ME. The Role of Diet and Nutrient Composition in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. J Acad Nutr Diet – April 2012 (Vol. 112, Issue 4, Pages 401-409, DOI:...

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What Is Naturopathic Medicine?

Posted by on Apr 25, 2012 in Health & Wellness | 0 comments

Naturopathic Medicine, also called Naturopathy, is a discipline of medicine that focuses on six main tenants or principles: First Do No Harm – primum non nocere The Healing Power of Nature – vis medicatrix naturae Discover and Treat the Cause, Not Just the Effect – tolle causam Treat the Whole Person – tolle totum The Physician is a Teacher – docere Prevention is the Best “Cure” – praevenire Naturopathic Medicine cares for primary health care needs. Within the United States, different states have their own sets of laws regarding the scope of practice of Naturopathic Medicine. For instance, in Arizona Naturopathic Medicine is governed by the Arizona Naturopathic Board. Naturopathic physicians have prescription rights, can perform minor surgery, and can perform manual manipulation or adjustments of the bones. Naturopathic Medicine considers the whole person. In addition, Naturopathic Medicine offers many other modalities (or ways to treat patients) such as homeopathy, laboratory testing, hydrotherapy, acupuncture, botanical medicine, dietary supplements, and nutrition. As the above basic principles of Naturopathic Medicine describe, the whole person is taken into consideration before a treatment plan is chosen. For example, instead of placing a patient on a pharmaceutical grade anti-depressant to treat the symptoms of depression, a Naturopathic Physician will search for and address the cause of the depression. The reason for one’s depression could be situational such as a work environment or a relationship. It could also be due to a nutrient deficiency that would cause a depletion of a specific neurotransmitter that assists in modulating mood. Deep sadness that accompanies the death of a close friend or family member is often perceived as depression, but is a perfectly healthy emotional response. Once the reason for the depression is discovered, appropriate psychological, nutritional, and/or lifestyle therapies can be prescribed.   Naturopathic medicine focuses on treatments that yield the fewest number of harmful side effects if any at all. Naturopathic medicine also emphasizes education so that the patient can make informed decisions independently regarding their health in the future. Prevention is not only taught but incorporated into the treatment plan. Finally, Naturopathic Medicine focuses on natural therapies that assist your body’s innate healing mechanisms to overcome health obstacles....

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